Hitachi Quartz records data on a substrate of quartz glass




Hitachi Quartz records data on a substrate of quartz glass

The Hitachi Quartz appears to be a promising material for the production of optical storage media capable of resisting wear and time. In 2015, perhaps the first commercial implementations will be appeared.

New Advances in research from the world of storage device, Hitachi has announced the development of a prototype support for storing information, which records data on a substrate of quartz glass and thus can withstand extreme environmental conditions without giving in to deterioration or degradation.

Hitachi Quartz records data on a substrate of quartz glass

The technology pioneered by Hitachi allows you to record data in binary form, practicing laser etching of thin layers of quartz which can then be read with common optical microscopes and an appropriate associated software. The prototype made by Hitachi has an area of 2cm square and is often 2mm, for a total of four layers of quartz. The incision of each layer has been possible using lasers with different focus points. This small card of quartz is characterized by an information density of about 40MB per square inch, slightly more than 35MB per square inch of a common music CD.

As mentioned just above, the strong point of this prototype is its high resistance to wear and to time: the Hitachi Quartz is a material able to resist to many chemicals, high temperatures (can be heated up to 1000 degree C for at least two hours without that there is damage to the crystal lattice and/or the data contained therein) and to radiation.

Currently, the Japanese giant has not detailed any practical implementation of this technology, except to say that it will take at least three years of work before it is ready for commercial realization. It still reasonable to believe that any solutions based on this technology will be proposed for large reality and companies that have to do with high piers of texts and information perhaps historical artifacts or public documents that need to be preserved over time.